Hasegawa 1/72 F-18A Part 6

Returned to this project to start the decals.   Modern aircraft have quite a few decals and in 1/72 scale some are very tiny… Considering the age of the decals they have been going on for the most part quite well.  I find they are ready to go within 30 seconds after dipping them in warm water. I thought the gloss coat I put on was smooth enough but the decals were very difficult to move once placed.  All the main ones were placed until I had a problem with one of the decals that makes up the false canopy on the underside of the aircraft. This is a feature that Canadian Hornets use.  The idea is the false canopy makes it slightly more difficult to tell the orientation of the aircraft so, during a dogfight, this delay could be used to the Hornet’s advantage.  In this case, one of them tore…

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Bench Update Dec 15th

I’ve been sick with a cold bug that has been going around for about a week which has really put a dampener on everything, including time at the bench. I was going to start to apply decals on the 1/72 Hasegawa F-18a but a close look at the sheet showed some yellowing.   So they will have to spend some time in a sunny window.  The issue of course is the days are very short and rather overcast right now so it may be a while….. The Tamiya 1/35 panther is at the point where some serious weathering needs to be done.  So I decided to start practicing some techniques I’ve been reading and viewing online.   First up is a general rust/distress technique and I’m doing it on an old HO scale refrigerator car I have. After some Vallejo Rust, some streaking grime, some pastels I have this as a start. …

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Dealing with seams in tires.

At least here is how I do it for landing gear wheels in aircraft. I use the following tools.  Spru cutter. Self-gripping tweezers. UMP Sanding Sticks Flex-I-File Sanders Toothpicks. Something to hold the toothpicks. In this case Mr. Paintstation. Craft glue (not pictured). The F-18 Hornet I’m currently working on has some rather pronounced seam lines on the tires. Using the UMP sanding stick I sand what I can while the wheel is on the spru.  I sand just enough to remove the seam, but not so much to create a flat spot on the wheel. The wheel is then cut from the spru. By using the self-closing tweezers I have a good grip on the wheel to sanding the two attachment points.  I then finish up any areas that need it with the Flex-I-File sanders. The wheels then are put onto toothpicks using the craft glue in preparation for priming/painting.

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